Keep it Local!

I had a beautiful neighborhood experience yesterday when I stopped by the fragrant Blue Meadow Flowers on E. 13th for a chat with one of the owners, one of the long-time Motherfolk still in the neighborhood.

We were talking about the slowdown in business and all the empty storefronts as he prepared for the Valentines rush. He explained how the local, longtime residents, friends and fellow businesses are the ones who keep businesses like his going when the glossier ones are going under.

And I realized that I have made a shift as well in my patterns of shopping and everyday life, without really noticing. Whenever possible, Ive pretty much pulled out of the chain stores - Duane Reade in particular, in favor of local establishments that carry the same goods, like Robin Raj.

Though its a bit more expensive, I WANT my local healthfood store to stay in business, and feel the same way about Whiskas, Halloween Adventure, Trash, Gothic Renaissance and all the singular shops between here and Houston Street.

Same for Cafe Orlin, Veselka and a small cadre of local bars including Section 8 and Nowhere.

So, remember to keep it local, and feel free to plug local favorites here, whatever your neighborhood..
Original Post
This is a great topic. We just saw a clip on "Veselka" last night on TV and have never been. A lot of the other shops mentioned in the segment had closed (Love Saves The Day, and the video store next to Trash)so we hoped it was still open. We're SO there next time we're in the EV.

We found a really interesting case of a group taking this idea one step further. A group called CarrotMob who do "Reverse Boycotts" on businesses. They did one here in Park Slope for family owned Tarzian Hardware because they were putting 22% of the days profits towards energy improvements and making the store more "green."

We thought this was a GREAT concept, and very easily reapplied to other local shops/causes.

Satori
Sorry to see Love Saves the Day going if only just for the great visual the front made.

The East Village is kind of synonymous with LOCAL to my mind since the vast majority of small stores are purposely located there by their owners if only because they would not be able to survive in any other neighborhood because of less agreeable rents west of First or Second Ave, north of 14th, to begin with. There have already been the demise of several out of scale, toney eateries in the nabe while smaller to scale places adjacent are still doing okay.
One of the best liquor stores is on the north west corner of Houston and B. Its run by a cute very aged couple. They actually have a quite large selection and always have deep discounts going on quite a few name brands. The hours are a bit whimsical though but usually if you can stop by late afternoons the proprietors are there. I get a chuckle from them because they always ask if I'm legal drinking age!
I also like to shop local. I did while I lived in NYC and I do now here in Baltimore. Things might be a bit different down here,, because there is high crime, not too many high end chain type stores opened up in Baltimore. Also not many big chain stores either, one has to travel to the county to shop at target, Wal-Mart or any of these types of stores. So, only the brave open up stores in some parts of my city.

One area has stores similar to what one would find on St. Marks Pl. But I have to take the Light Rail to get there and I always get hassled on that train. This area(Hamden) also has a “Hon” festival where gals and some guys put on their highest beehive hairdoos and compete for the title of Miss Hon,, some on this forum could win that title,,,lol

But the hood that I live in is quite depressed, just the basic stores like grocery/lottery, pizza, liquor, bars, Chinese take out, stores like that. I have to travel for clothes and other stuff.

Not far from me is a market, sort of like an indoor flea market but merchants have a square space selling different foods, cooked and non cooked, these stalls are operated by small owners. The barbecue chicken and ribs are good.

The only area I know of here that has any high end shops are at the tourist area of the Inner Harbor, I never shop there,, it’s for tourists, like New Yorkers coming to see a Yankee game. Even in the gay area of Mount Vernon, I don’t remember seeing any expensive chain type stores, most stores are local people.
FASHION FROM THE LITTLE BUSH ECONOMIC COLLAPSE
Utility jeans $7.00, Kmart: Caterpillar steel toe boot, less than $70.00 at onlinebootstore.com: Cotton hoody $8.00, Hsi Nao sidewalk merchant usually on Baxter Street: Traditional Khmer Kroma scarf $1.00, Phnom Pen: Cotton ramie coat by International Concepts %65 off at a Macy’s panic sale: Cotton head scarf 3 for $1.00 Sami’s street stall 6th Avenue at 24th Street.: Tinted sunglasses $3.00 at any number of places on St. Marks Place. Model:Moi, in front of LIQUORS, Avenue B at Houston where there are so many items on deep discount your brain will be intoxicated by having too many choices so you may not have to douse your liver at all.

Attachments

Photos (1)
FASHION FROM THE LITTLE BUSH ECONOMIC COLLAPSE
Billie is dressed for work in Demonia ankle boots 60% off at a panic sale from Trash Vaudeville; nylon/spandex top $12 by LIPSERVICE at Little Ricky’s; super low rise spandex bell bottoms $10 by Symphony at Necessary Clothing; cotton coat dress $15 by Scarlett at Joyce Leslie; hair by Arthur’s livingroom; makeup by Revlon at any Rite Aide. Billie is in front of Snack Dragon on E. 3rd Street near Avenue B, locally owned and open late for very homemade tacos, carne, pollo, fish or quinoa, starting at $3. Plus it’s the only place with the Nuyorican Symphony-Poetry Live recording on their boombox.

Attachments

Photos (1)
I’m glad to see from your pics Seven that they didn’t clean all the graffiti from NY.

There are some other types of bargain stores near me,, the kind that sell cheap jeans on one table and soap powder on the next table, ya just have to push the ladies aside in order to get the better item. Sometimes the scene in the store can look like the vid from 1000 Stevies.

Nice pics Seven, I like the one of ya in front of the Liquor store, that's usually where I would be standing.
CUISINE FROM THE LITTLE BUSH ECONOMIC COLLAPSE
One slice multigrain wholegrain bread $2.00 per loaf at C-Town supermarket. One dollop of generic brand sweet relish $1.99 at most bodegas south of 14th Street. One string bean about $1.00 a pound at select vendors in the Union Square farmer's market if you wait until closing time. Enamel coated tin plate made in China bought fourth hand three for one buck from a street vendor on the corner of 3rd Street and Avenue D. The 'Sweet Bone on a Futon' is great late night on the roof when the fragrance of the slightly dampened grains, yellow dye #5, corn syrup and tang of vinegar mix well with exhaust fumes. It's also choice munchy post performance at a place like the Petite Versailles.

Attachments

Photos (1)
quote:
CUISINE FROM THE LITTLE BUSH ECONOMIC COLLAPSE
One slice multigrain wholegrain bread $2.00 per loaf at C-Town supermarket. One dollop of generic brand sweet relish $1.99 at most bodegas south of 14th Street. One string bean about $1.00 a pound at select vendors in the Union Square farmer's market if you wait until closing time. Enamel coated tin plate made in China bought fourth hand three for one buck from a street vendor on the corner of 3rd Street and Avenue D. The 'Sweet Bone on a Futon' is great late night on the roof when the fragrance of the slightly dampened grains, yellow dye #5, corn syrup and tang of vinegar mix well with exhaust fumes. It's also choice munchy post performance at a place like the Petite Versailles.


This post is ART I tell you..

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×