I don't think Bowie was ever in Hopelessly Devoted section (or was I sleeping)

Just has to give major props to the man that really influenced my childhood.. I just got the new Box set ... he is a real genius. Just image wise alone... the changes of face is fantastic (bear in mind he was image changing before the days of paid stylists and image makers - so there Miss madonna!)... Musically he has dished out some brilliant stuff ... from early Hunky Dory / to Heroes (new box set features a version of Heroes in German that'a fab!)... to Ashes to Ashes...Low... Young Americans... work with Brian Eno... et al... Plus look at him .. he's fuckin hot... (check him out in the new Vittel advert http://www.davidbowie.com/reality/features/ )
I don't know him, have never even met him... but he seems like a good egg... lets give props..
Original Post
Well, at first I thought it lacked a lot, felt like a return to his late 80's pop sensibilities, which after the genius of his 90's work, like Outside, seemed like a sucker punch.

Still, I'm nothing if not an ardent Bowie fan, and repeated listneing does deliver an appreciation for the musicianship rampant throughout the work. Lovely sounds, if not songs. His own vocal performance is strong, the timbre of his voice takes on delicate nuances as he's aging. He can tremble and flutter in a manner that feels authentic now, whereas pulling that same hat trick before sounded...pretentious, even from him.

Reality is worth listening to - it's easily enough downloaded, but be prepared for having to work at liking it.
yes..."Hours" does it make for perfect sunday catnap music

but "Heathen" which was released in 2002 showed both maturity and spirit...not to mention that the CD art was well done... I play it now and then...

I wonder what drives David Bowie at this point... doing this for so many years what keeps him going? aside from admiring and respecting his work I keep up to see what is next... David Bowie is a master Chameleon... none can compare...



Cactus from Heathen

Sitting here
Wishing on a cement floor
Just wishing that
I had just something you wore
I put it on when I go lonely
Will you take off your dress
And send it to me?

I miss your kissin'
And I miss your head
And a letter in your writing
Doesn't mean you're not dead

Just run outside in the desert heat
Make your dress all wet
And send it to me
I miss your soup and I miss your bread
And a letter in your writing
Doesn't mean you're not dead
So spill your breakfast
And drip your wine
Just wear that dress when you dine




I think I will pop it in now...

--

http://MetropolisNYC.com

feed the fire of your desire...
I dunno, I think Hours, while rather sedate, is by far the superior album on a whole by comparison to Reality.

Of course you know that Cactus, featured above, was a cover song, written and originally recorded by Frank Black of the Pixies. Pablo Picasso is also a cover, I believe of Jonathan Richmond.

Amateurs borrow, professionals steal, but Bowie...appropriates.
nooooo...

I knew that he didn't write it but I didn't know it was a cover...oh David...

but wait... I smell redemption Wink


Bring Me the Disco King

(written by David Bowie 2003, performed by David Bowie, Maynard James Keenan & John Frusciante)


You promised me the ending would be clear
You'd let me know when the time was now
Don't let me know when you're opening the door
Stab me in the dark, let me disappear

Memories that flutter like bats out of hell
Stab you from the city spires
Life wasn't worth the balance
Or the crumpled paper it was written on

Don't let me know we're invisible
Don't let me know we're invisible

Hot cash days that you trailed around
Cold cold nights under chrome and glass
Led me down river of perfumed limbs
Sent me to the streets with the good time girls

Don't let me know we're invisible
Don't let me know we're invisible
We could dance, dance, dance thru' the fire
Dance, dance, dance thru' the fire

Feed me no lies
I don't know about you, I don't know about you
Breathe through the years
I don't know about you, I don't know about you
Bring me the disco king
I don't know about you, I don't know about you
Dead or alive, bring me the disco king
Bring me the disco king, bring me the disco king
Bring me the disco king

Spin-offs with those who slept like corpses
Damp morning rays in the stiff bad clubs
Killing time in the '70s
Smelling of love through the moist winds
Don't let me know when you're opening the door
Close me in the dark, let me disappear
Soon there'll be nothing left of me
Nothing left to release

Dance, dance, dance thru' the fire
Dance, dance, dance thru' the fire
Feed me no lies
I don't know about you, I don't know about you
Breathe through the years
I don't know about you, I don't know about you
Bring me the disco king
I don't know about you, I don't know about you
Dead or alive, bring me the disco king


--

http://MetropolisNYC.com

feed the fire of your desire...
I enjoy Bowie's music a lot, but was more influenced by him as a 70s fashion icon than anything else. His brand of androgynous drag, over-the-top glam chic and ambiguous sexuality was one of the things that led me into the club world to begin with. His chic even translated to his film appearances like "The Hunger". So hot.

Also, everyone loves to put down his 80s top-40 commercial pop stint, but personally I loved that period of his career as much as the rest of it. I would just as soon rock out to "Cat People", "Under Pressure" or "Let's Dance" as I would to Pin-Ups or Ziggy Stardust. Granted those songs were not brilliant but they were good clean fun and there's a lot to be said for that.
Sure, the Let's Dance period wasn't really so bad as some protest. And if he'd have sufficiently moved on from there into a less pop direction so uch the better. But to go even more mainstream was unexpected, and even he, himself has lamented this period as his nadir.

I do like a few songs from "Let's Dance" 's follow-up, "Tonight", but on the whole it fails to capture me. Sadly, that Glass Spider Never Let Me Down thing that came on the heels of it was utterly embarassing. He *had* to do that Tin Machine rock band experiment to shake that slime away, and all the newfound fans with it.

For the most part, his 90's period was all about returning to music as an artform. "Outside" remains one of my top five all-time favorite albums by any artist - it's breathtaking.
We've done a lot of video and music trading with people online, and one of the sets of treasures we ended up with is 6-7 hours (two VHS full)of Bowie performances/videos.

We yanked them out LATE on New Years Eve for some of our friends who hadn't seen them. Some of our very favorite:

-- Bowie/Cher medley (around Young American's Era)it is so tragic it's funny Smile

-- 2 performances with Klaus Nomi and Joey Arias on Saturday Night Live

-- "I've got you." performance with Marianne Faithfull. (She's wearing a flying nun deal, and he's got red wings coming out of the front of his pants)

Smile

When you see these types of things back-to-back you realize there really isn't much this man HASN'T done or tried.

XXXOOO
Satori
quote:

For the most part, his 90's period was all about returning to music as an artform. "Outside" remains one of my top five all-time favorite albums by any artist - it's breathtaking.


yes... great work that many did not get... that is when I started to see David in the present musically rather then in the past... I did not hear the thin white duke phase as much as see it on mute

--

http://MetropolisNYC.com

feed the fire of your desire...
But the reason why i give him MORE props that others is that allot of his images/music/ideas are from HIM not a stylist etc... HE is the MAIN creative force/gleaner of info... whereras thats what i hate about most of the new stars (eg MADONNA!!!) they just hire folks to re-invent them...
When discussing David Bowie, we must include the movie Labrynth. Tights, Tights and more TIGHTS. Everyone loves David Bowie in those tights. I remember being 13 or so and watching the movie for the first time. Mr. Bowie has a big chorus number with a shitload of singing muppets. I could not keep my eyes off of his bulge. I don't know if it was a good dance belt or good genes. If you have not seen the movie rush out and rent it.

I purchased a shirt in the East Village in July that has a picture of Mr. Bowie on the front and says "I fucked Mick Jagger." It is one of my prized posessions.

March 29 I have tickets to see Mr. Bowie in concert in Philadelphia. WHOA! I hope he wears the tights.

I'd love to be a seam in the crotch of those tights. Big Grin
I was just reading the posts in this category, and noticed the vast majority speak only of Davids more recent work and ignore his stuff from the early 1970's, which I consider his most inspired work (Space Oddity; The Man Who Sold the World; Hunky Dory; The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars; Aladin Sane). David Bowie has been a major influence on my life. Like many artists, it is difficult for those who weren't around when the artist first began influencing music to really appreciate the creative force that was so unique at that time. How totally new and fresh he sounded then. I first heard him in 1972 (late by British standards) in a friends bedroom. He was so turned on by this new artist and sound and played the Space Oddityalbum for me. I was knocked out like the first time I had heard Jimi Hendrix, The Cream, or The Doors. But there was so many more dimensions to these words, music and theatricality than I had ever heard before. Bowie was like this little gremlin speaking to me from deep within my very DNA. He was so assertivly and openly being unashamedly feminine, and being so sexy at the same time. He really grabbed me and wouldn't let go. "Cygnet Committee" struck a very deep chord within me, connecting with my own inner truth so desperately trying to get to the surface and scream out like Bowie quoting Susan Hayward "I WANT TO LIVE!!!" Not long after, at a pot party, again in a friends bedroom (I was 17), I heard "The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars" and was completely turned on like never before. I still consider this album to be one of the greatest masterpieces of Rock, right next to Sargent Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club. It was much influenced by Stanley Kubrick Movies popular at the time, like 2001: A Space Oddysey, and A Clockwork Orange. I saw it as a Sci-Fi Rock story. For a while Bowie performed the finale: Rock 'N Roll Suicide while being pulled into a Black Hole ("Give me your hands...") which was a finale scenario more recently appropriated (stolen?) by Hedwig and the Angry Inch. I remember what a deeply moving experience it was to hear all of those albums for the first time, and I'm glad that it was always with others, where everyone listened intently with breathless excitment.

I also remember the insane homophobia here in the states that surrounded any mention of Bowie in the early seventies. Even in 1976, my wearing a Bowie T-shirt was akin to many ignoran-tay in New Jersey to wearing a sign saying "I'M GAY!" Hence he didn't really get much airplay even, until he sold out and became more acceptable for the mainstream. I didn't see Bowie perform until July 1974, the Diamond Dogs Tour, at Madison Square. I went with a group of friends,glittery boys and girls, all anticipating a continuation of Ziggy. Although the show was sensational, even by Madison Square Garden standards (He sang "Time" on a swing high above the stage, in old Lady of Burlesque style) we were all disappointed that he had closed the door on Glam Rock, and was now this "thin white duke." Only Bowie could single handedly do that. Even though the vast majority of the United States were not ready for it (Androgynous glam rock), we were, and we all felt we needed it. It was sad to see that it wasn't to be, at least as far as we could see, here in the states (I was then ignorant of much of what was happening only in the UK and Europe at that time). The alien who had showed us the way, had jumped the track and was now on another path. Before long we were on that path too, eating up all that he delivered. Station to Station, played LOUD on good equipment is still fantastic!

I just realized I've gone on way too long here, but feel like I've barely scratched the surface on this man and how he has affected me. I also must say that there were groups that continued carrying the flame that he had begun, such as Queen and Parliament. Much can also be said for the musical guitar stylings that came from Mick Ronson in those early days and how much they contributed to the greatness of the sound. I still joyfully hear his influence on such artists as Gina from the Lunachicks. ALso the influence Bowie had on other artists, such as on Lou Reeds "Transformer" album, Mott the Hoople, or Iggy after he left the Stooges.

In the early seventies, while so much of music had stagnated and become so boring (before the Punk and then New Wave explosion) Bowie was creating some truely fantastic stuff.

[This message was edited by Stacy Amber on 03-25-04 at 10:25 AM.]
Well said Stacy!!!
Bowie was HUGE influence on so many people... and in my 'hood he paved the way for everyone to suddenly announce they were bisexual!!!! LOL
I was laughing about just this recently with my ole theatre school mates "remember when all the lads in our class wore eye lines and were announcing that they were bisexual like Bowie" we were all into Roxy and Bowie.. the first lad i ever made out with had the full Young Americans look and eye lines (he's a raving queen now of course!)....i remember going to his house and blasting out the LOW album thinking we were so avant gard and his mum storming in the room screaming cos he 'stole' her lipstick ...!! so he just played Bowie louder WWBD (what would Bowie Do was our mantra!! LOL LOL). Course only MY first boyfriend had nicer make up than i did!
Have you seen the new H (Tommy Hilfigure) campaign with Bowie and Iman - Damm he is soo fuckin hot!!! can't help it... if only I were about 200lb lighter and tanned to a lovleee black shade he would defo fancy me! I am sure!

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